Install this theme
newsweek:

In the last two months, Amazon has spotlighted two new products that allow shoppers to add items to their shopping list without ever typing anything into a search bar. This isn’t a coincidence. 

The most recent one is Amazon Dash — a thin, wand-like device, revealed on Friday, that includes both a microphone and a barcode scanner. Speak into it or scan a box of cereal or pack of toilet paper to automatically add that product to your AmazonFresh shopping list. 

For now, it is available only on a trial basis to Amazon customers in San Francisco and Los Angeles who pay for Amazon’s new Prime Fresh membership, which includes grocery delivery. 

Before Dash, Amazon announced in February that it was adding a technology called Flow to its main shopping app on mobile phones. A user taps on the Flow feature in the app, points the phone at a product in their home — say, a book or a bottle of shampoo — and Flow is supposed to quickly display the product page on the phone’s screen. 

Both Dash and Flow seem a bit gimmicky now. And I have no idea whether either will ever move past that stage and toward mass adoption. But they are both signs that Amazon is seriously thinking about how to remove as much friction as possible for people who are looking to buy a specific item from Amazon, but are on the move and not sitting behind a desk staring at a computer screen. 

Amazon Dash and The Race To Slash The Time Between “Want” and “Buy” | Re/code

newsweek:

In the last two months, Amazon has spotlighted two new products that allow shoppers to add items to their shopping list without ever typing anything into a search bar. This isn’t a coincidence.

The most recent one is Amazon Dash — a thin, wand-like device, revealed on Friday, that includes both a microphone and a barcode scanner. Speak into it or scan a box of cereal or pack of toilet paper to automatically add that product to your AmazonFresh shopping list.

For now, it is available only on a trial basis to Amazon customers in San Francisco and Los Angeles who pay for Amazon’s new Prime Fresh membership, which includes grocery delivery.

Before Dash, Amazon announced in February that it was adding a technology called Flow to its main shopping app on mobile phones. A user taps on the Flow feature in the app, points the phone at a product in their home — say, a book or a bottle of shampoo — and Flow is supposed to quickly display the product page on the phone’s screen.

Both Dash and Flow seem a bit gimmicky now. And I have no idea whether either will ever move past that stage and toward mass adoption. But they are both signs that Amazon is seriously thinking about how to remove as much friction as possible for people who are looking to buy a specific item from Amazon, but are on the move and not sitting behind a desk staring at a computer screen.

Amazon Dash and The Race To Slash The Time Between “Want” and “Buy” | Re/code

hollyhocksandtulips:

IBM, 1962

hollyhocksandtulips:

IBM, 1962

An extremely simple, pluggable static site generator.
nasanasa:

Alan Turing | Pilot ACE [Automatic Computing Engine . 1950s]

nasanasa:

Alan Turing | Pilot ACE [Automatic Computing Engine . 1950s]

newsweek:

Newsweek Rewind: Our First Article About the Web, Which Just Turned 25
On March 12, 1989, British computer scientist Sir Tim Berners-Lee proposed an “information management” system that would become known as the Web. We celebrate the twenty-fifth anniversary of his world-changing invention on the first edition of our new weekly feature, Newsweek Rewind. We dug through our archive and pulled our first article about the Web, from our October 31, 1994 issue. Click here for the full text of the piece, “Oh, what a Tangled Web,” by Barbara Kantrowitz with Adam Rogers and Jennifer Tanaka.

newsweek:

Newsweek Rewind: Our First Article About the Web, Which Just Turned 25

On March 12, 1989, British computer scientist Sir Tim Berners-Lee proposed an “information management” system that would become known as the Web. We celebrate the twenty-fifth anniversary of his world-changing invention on the first edition of our new weekly feature, Newsweek Rewind. We dug through our archive and pulled our first article about the Web, from our October 31, 1994 issue. Click here for the full text of the piece, “Oh, what a Tangled Web,” by Barbara Kantrowitz with Adam Rogers and Jennifer Tanaka.

liquidswords-:

lesbianwarfare:

terminal-dogma:

celestethebest:

thisiswealthyprivilege:

awesomefuckyeahmotherfucker:

allisonrae:

majd3st1ny:

Could you live on $8 or $9 dollars an hour? A computer game made by the Urban Ministries of Durham in North Carolina and an advertising firm called McKinney lets you play out life with a low-wage job as a single mom. The objective is to make it a month, juggling getting a job, rent, a place to live, food and coping with the costs of repairs, things for your child, insurance, etc.. Actually a very hard game to play and full of reminders of the difficulties of life on that kind of salary.
Play the game.

Seriously, if you haven’t played before, play it now. If you have played before, play it again. Especially important during this election season.

just playing this game alone made me really stressed and anxious

THANK YOU
THANK YOU
ALL THE HATER ANONS, PLAY THIS

This game is amazing. Play it, play it, play it! I shared this with a professor who then had her students play it. So real.

they made us play this game in first year personal finance and I’m so so glad they did. there’s so many people in my rich privileged school district who needed to see this even as just a little simulation.

It’s sad that people need a simulation to tell them this instead of listening to people who actually live their lives like this.

i was trying to find this game again!

liquidswords-:

lesbianwarfare:

terminal-dogma:

celestethebest:

thisiswealthyprivilege:

awesomefuckyeahmotherfucker:

allisonrae:

majd3st1ny:

Could you live on $8 or $9 dollars an hour? A computer game made by the Urban Ministries of Durham in North Carolina and an advertising firm called McKinney lets you play out life with a low-wage job as a single mom. The objective is to make it a month, juggling getting a job, rent, a place to live, food and coping with the costs of repairs, things for your child, insurance, etc.. Actually a very hard game to play and full of reminders of the difficulties of life on that kind of salary.

Play the game.

Seriously, if you haven’t played before, play it now. If you have played before, play it again. Especially important during this election season.

just playing this game alone made me really stressed and anxious

THANK YOU

THANK YOU

ALL THE HATER ANONS, PLAY THIS

This game is amazing. Play it, play it, play it! I shared this with a professor who then had her students play it. So real.

they made us play this game in first year personal finance and I’m so so glad they did. there’s so many people in my rich privileged school district who needed to see this even as just a little simulation.

It’s sad that people need a simulation to tell them this instead of listening to people who actually live their lives like this.

i was trying to find this game again!

jellobiafrasays:

cryptography and data security (1983 ed.)

jellobiafrasays:

cryptography and data security (1983 ed.)

challengepostblog:

Challenge.gov Webinar: How to Run a Successful Software / App Challenge

Last week, our CEO & founder Brandon Kessler, co-hosted a webinar with DigitalGov University to answer some of the most common questions about the value proposition, operational concerns, and best practices for app challenges.

Highlights of the discussion include:

  • Making sure the challenge is meaningful to a developer audience
  • Keeping data and/or API documentation clear and user-friendly
  • Developing a smart marketing plan around your challenge
  • Considerations regarding rules such as eligibility, submission requirements, and intellectual property